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November 2017 Archives

Medicaid and Medicare fraud at Manhattan pharmacy alleged

It is invariably disturbing and even frightening to receive a subpoena or to be indicted as part of a civil or criminal investigation. A Manhattan pharmacy owner and a pharmacist at the Tribeca locale were recently indicted on grand larceny charges, according to a news report.

Jury says doctor and fiancée violated Anti-Kickback Statute

When two people become engaged to marry, they pledge themselves to a lifetime of love and companionship. But a federal grand jury has said that a neurosurgeon and his fiancée got much than that out of their relationship.

Judge declares mistrial in Menendez case

The New York Times and media outlets across the nation recently spread the news: the sprawling, months-long federal corruption trial of Senator Robert Menendez is over. The powerful New Jersey pol was defiant and relieved after the judge declared a mistrial because the jury was deadlocked.

How nurses can lose their license in ways unrelated to work

Familiar ways that nurses (and other medical professionals, for that matter) can lose their license are often related to their work. For example, falsifying records and neglecting patients are common causes of license suspension or revocation. However, these work behaviors and errors are not the only forms of misconduct you need to avoid.

3 tips for new nurses to avoid misconduct allegations

As a nurse, you must follow high standards of professionalism. When you interact with patients, doctors, nursing assistants and other nurses, you must be mindful of your ethics, morals and conduct. It is important to monitor your own performance and ensure you are doing everything correctly. 

Can stress or anxiety cause you to lose your nursing license?

Stress is an unfortunate part of life for many Americans, especially those whose jobs require long hours or grueling physical labor. As a nurse in New York, you are well aware that both of these factors combine to make one of the country's most stressful and demanding careers.

Sleep and meals do not count as work in 24-hour shifts

In the state of New York, there is a long-standing practice that if a home care attendant works a 24-hour shift, their employer need only pay them for 13 hours of work. This is because the remaining 11 hours are spent, presumably, eating meals and sleeping. Although this practice has been the legal precedent in New York for years, two recent court cases nearly toppled it entirely.